• Lori Melnitsky

Will My Child Outgrow Stuttering?

By Lori Melnitsky, MA CCC-SLP



Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and pauses. People who stutter may repeat words, syllables, or phrases, or they may prolong sounds. This disruption in speech can make it difficult for people who stutter to communicate effectively.


There is no known single cause of stuttering, but it is believed to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Some research suggests that stuttering may be linked to problems with the way the brain processes speech and language.


Stuttering can occur at any age, but it is most common in children between the ages of 2 and 6. It is four times more common in boys than girls. Most children who stutter will eventually outgrow the condition, but some will continue to stutter into adulthood.


The majority of children who stutter will eventually outgrow the condition. However, some children will continue to stutter into adulthood. Early intervention is important for children who stutter because it can help them learn ways to cope with the condition and improve their communication skills.

What are the Treatments For Stuttering?


There is no cure for stuttering, but there are several effective treatments that can help people who stutter to improve their speech. Some of the most common treatment options include:


Speech therapy: This treatment can help people who stutter learn ways to control their speech and reduce the frequency of stuttering. The goal of speech therapy is to help people improve their quality of speaking and improve communication skills.


Speech therapy can help people who stutter learn ways to control their speech and reduce the frequency of stuttering. The goal of speech therapy is to help people improve their quality of life and communication skills.


Lidcombe Stuttering Therapy:

A researched and effective program ages 2 to 6. Parents are taught to work with their preschooler.



Fluency shaping:

This approach focuses on helping people who stutter to gradually increase their speech fluency. It is used more often after age 7.


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What is the Long-Term Outlook for Children who Stutter?


It is important to remember that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating stuttering, but many different therapies and techniques can be effective in helping people manage their stuttering and improve their communication skills. If you or someone you know is struggling with stuttering, there are many resources available to help. Encourage and praise efforts.


Tips for Speaking with Children Who Stutter

If you know a child who stutters, there are a few things you can do to help them feel more comfortable and confident when speaking. Here are a few tips:


● Be patient: It can be tempting to finish sentences or to hurry them along, but this can actually make the stuttering worse. It is important to be patient and allow the child to take their time when speaking.


● Encourage them to take breaks: Pausing often helps.


● Focus on the content, not the fluency: When speaking with a child who stutters, it is important to focus on the content of what they are saying, not their fluency. This can help the child feel more confident and reduce the feeling that they need to hurry up and finish their sentence.


● Model slow and easy speech: One way to help a child who stutters is to model slow and easy speech. This can help the child to relax and feel less pressure to hurry up and finish their sentence.


● Be a good listener: It can be helpful to model patience and listen carefully when speaking with a child who stutters. This can help the child feel more comfortable and reduce the pressure they may feel to hurry up and finish their sentence.


Encourage them to seek help: If a child is struggling with stuttering, encourage parents to seek help from a speech therapist specializing in stuttering. Early intervention is important for children who stutter, and there are many resources available to help. For more information, visit www.allislandspeech.com

Lori@allislandspeech.com


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