• Lori Melnitsky

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Stuttering

Frequently Asked Questions: (FAQ)- ten important facts to know about Stuttering:

  1. What is stuttering? Stuttering is a disruption in the normal flow of speech called fluency. It is often called stammering in various parts of the world. Many people who stutter repeat parts of words, whole word repetitions ex: (I, I, I), prolong sounds (ex: sssssounds), have silent blocks and might change harder producing words to easier words. It presents differently in everyone.

  2. Are people who stutter nervous? No, this is a myth. At times anxiety can increase stuttering but it is not the cause.

  3. Why do people stutter? The exact cause is unknown. We know a combination of factors contribute to persistent stuttering. They are genetics, language development, environmental factors and neurologic factors.

  4. Do stuttering run in families? At times. Over half of people who stutter have a family history of stuttering.

  5. Do we use the word stutterer? No it is a label. The preferred term is person who stutters (pws).

  6. Is stuttering related to intelligence? There is no link between stuttering and level of intelligence.

  7. Does telling people who stutter to slow down and breathe help? People who stutter have no problems breathing. This could increase stuttering and cause breathing disregulation increasing stuttering.

  8. How important is seeking help for stuttering? It is very important. Many children will stop stuttering before the age of 7 with therapy and drastically reduce stuttering after that age. It is not beneficial to wait and see if they outgrow it

  9. Are parents responsible for stuttering? No nor do they learn stuttering from siblings or parents.

  10. How many people stutter? One percent of the population. It is about 3 million Americans who stutter. That is more than 70 million people in the world.

For more information please contact Lori@allislandspeech.com and visit www.allislandspeech.com

#stuttering

#speechtherapy

#loriMelnitsky

Frequently Asked Questions: (FAQ)- ten important facts to know about Stuttering:

  1. What is stuttering? Stuttering is a disruption in the normal flow of speech called fluency. It is often called stammering in various parts of the world. Many people who stutter repeat parts of words, whole word repetitions ex: (I, I, I, prolong sounds (ex: sssssounds), have silent blocks and might change harder producing words to easier words. It presents differently in everyone.

  1. Are people who stutter nervous? No, this is a myth. At times anxiety can increase stuttering but it is not the cause.

  1. Why do people stutter? The exact cause is unknown. We know a combination of factors contribute to persistent stuttering. They are genetics, language development, environmental factors and neurologic factors.

  1. Does stuttering run in families? At times. Over half of people who stutter have a family history of stuttering.

  2. Do we use the word stutterer? No it is a label. The preferred term is person who stutters (pws).

  3. Is stuttering related to intelligence? There is no link between stuttering and level of intelligence.

  1. Does telling people who stutter to slow down and breathe help? People who stutter have no problems breathing. This could increase stuttering and cause breathing disregulation increasing stuttering.

  1. How important is seeking help for stuttering? It is very important. Many children will stop stuttering before the age of 7 with therapy and drastically reduce stuttering after that age. It is not beneficial to wait and see if they outgrow it.

  1. Are parents responsible for stuttering? No nor do they learn stuttering from siblings or parents.

  1. How many people stutter? One percent of the population. It is about 3 million Americans who stutter. That is more than 70 million people in the world.

For more information please contact Lori@allislandspeech.com and visit www.allislandspeech.com

3 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

How to Communicate with Your Loved One Who Has Parkinson’s If you are caring for a loved one with Parkinson’s disease, you are probably familiar with two of the hallmark physical symptoms: tremors and

Best Communication Hacks for Adults with ADHD You speak a lot! But it doesn’t seem like people recognize what you mean? You often confuse them. Why does this happen? You may be affected with attention