• Lori Melnitsky

Life Changing Tips for Starting College with ADHD or Executive Functioning Challenges:

Best Tips for Starting College with ADHD

With so many students with ADHD being admitted to college every year, it's important to know what you're getting into. In this guide, we'll discuss how ADHD manifests in college students and what you can do about it—whether you're a parent, student, or educator.

ADHD can be an invisible disability that impacts everything from academics to relationships. Students with ADHD typically have trouble following directions, keeping track of assignments, and remembering deadlines. This can cause anxiety around academics and social situations; however, there are solutions that will make your life easier as a student who has been diagnosed with ADHD.

Have a plan before you arrive on campus.

Having a concrete plan before you arrive on campus is essential. Before you leave home, make sure that:

● You have all the equipment you need for your accommodation and classes. Arrive early to ensure that everything is set up correctly, and allow yourself time to get acquainted with your surroundings.

● You know not how to get from home to campus, and vice versa (or wherever else may be important). In addition, don't miss out on one of the most important things in college life - getting involved in extracurricular activities! This will help keep life structured as many with ADHD need. Too much extra time can lead to procrastinating and possibly impulsive decisions.

Know your triggers and avoid them.

What are your triggers? For me, it’s deadlines and rushing. I need to start at least a week in advance and then I can work quickly. If you have a different set of triggers, great! Use this as an opportunity to get really clear about what they are and how you can avoid them.

Most people who have ADHD (even those who don’t have it) deal with stress in some way, shape, or form. In many cases, it can cause anxiety if larger steps n are not broken down into smaller ones. Often people with ADHD engage in negative self- talk such as : I am not as good as anyone else, I am terrible at math. Watch for this negative self -talk.

Stay organized

If you know that you have trouble with the organization of your life, it is important to get help prior to starting college and keep the support. There are many apps and computer programs that can help you stay on track and manage your time better. Try making lists of things that need to be done, including daily and weekly goals, so that you can see what needs to be focused on at any given moment. If it helps, set alarms or reminders throughout the day so that nothing slips through the cracks! The reminder app and notes apps on the iphone are very helpful.

You'll also want to consider using a planner or calendar app for this purpose. These tools will allow you to keep track of scheduled events and deadlines in one place without having them scattered throughout different apps on your phone or computer. They're also easy enough to use: just write down all the things that need doing each day into one section (or multiple sections if necessary), then check off items once they've been completed! This might sound easy but with someone with executive functioning challenges it is not.


Plan Your Time: Assess and Prioritize

A lot of students with ADHD struggle to focus on one thing for a long time. You may be able to stay focused for an hour, but then your mind starts to wander and you can't get back into the work at hand. This is where planning comes in! Planning out your day with lists, schedules, and schedules will help keep you on track with your schoolwork while also helping you manage your time in other ways.

One way that helps is by prioritizing their tasks: If there are two things that need to be done today—a paper due tomorrow and a project due next week—they'll usually prioritize based on importance: The paper due tomorrow takes precedence because it's earlier in time than the project due next week.

Start the Day on Time

Many people with ADHD have a hard time getting up in the morning. They may forget to set their alarm clocks and become distracted by something they see on the way to school. Setting your alarm early and using it consistently is one of the best things you can do as an ADHD student.

Calendars are helpful not just for scheduling events, but also in reminding you of assignments that need to be completed by a particular date or day of the week. By using a calendar that has specific slots for each class throughout your day, you'll be less likely to miss important deadlines or assignments due at different times each week. You can also use these calendars as reminders about when certain events are happening (such as tests), which will help prevent other distractions from taking over your focus during those times when it's most important!

If you're having trouble keeping track of all your assignments and deadlines while trying to keep up with other important commitments like family time or socializing with friends, consider using Google Calendar instead! This handy tool allows users access from any device (including smart phones) so there's no excuse not knowing whether or not something needs attention today!"

Not all of us learn in the same way. Talking aloud to a coach can help understand ADHD and figure out strategies to achieve these goals.

Take breaks.

Taking breaks is an important part of learning to manage your ADHD. Taking breaks allows you to come back to the task with fresh eyes and a clear head, which can help you focus more effectively. This helps your executive functioning goals become clearer.

Here are some examples of things you could do during a break:

● Read something that interests you

● Listen to music (or talk radio)

● Take a walk outside (or inside if weather permits)

The length of your breaks depends on how much work you need before returning to your task. If there’s still some time left after taking a short break, then go ahead and take another one! Some people need thirty minutes on and 30 min off.

Stay in touch with family and friends at home.

To make the transition back to school, it can be helpful to stay in touch with friends and family. Make sure you call or email your mom or dad at least once a week so they know what's going on in your life. If you have siblings, talk to them often, too!

If you're feeling lonely or isolated during the first few weeks of school, don't forget about the importance of communication! It's important for everyone involved (students with ADHD included) that everyone understands how their needs are being met and who else is working to meet those needs. Students should set goals for themselves related to communication; these goals could include:

● Calling home regularly

● Writing emails weekly instead of monthly

● Talking more often than usual and being open about any struggles they may be having

Conclusion

As you're reading this, you may still be unsure of what to do next. But remember: You have the power to make your own choices in life and live a happy, fulfilling life with ADHD. If anything, these tips should give you some direction and remind you that there are many others out there just like yourself who are doing amazing things. And if not now, then maybe someday soon!

So go forth into your new adventure with this new knowledge; explore every possibility; learn from those around you, and above all else—enjoy it. It is ok to make mistakes. We learn from it and move on.

For more information on coaching please visit www.allislandspeech.com/adhd-life-coaching


Lori Melnitsky is a certified ADHD coach and an experienced speech/language pathologist. Lori@allislandspeech.com


Parents can also join the face book page for parents of adults of children over age 16.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/768563444534843


#executivefunctioning

#ADHDcoaching

Best Tips for Starting College with ADHD

With so many students with ADHD being admitted to college every year, it's important to know what you're getting into. In this guide, we'll discuss how ADHD manifests in college students and what you can do about it—whether you're a parent, student, or educator.

ADHD can be an invisible disability that impacts everything from academics to relationships. Students with ADHD typically have trouble following directions, keeping track of assignments, and remembering deadlines. This can cause anxiety around academics and social situations; however, there are solutions that will make your life easier as a student who has been diagnosed with ADHD.

Have a plan before you arrive on campus.

Having a concrete plan before you arrive on campus is essential. Before you leave home, make sure that:

● You have all the equipment you need for your accommodation and classes. Arrive early to ensure that everything is set up correctly, and allow yourself time to get acquainted with your surroundings.

● You know not how to get from home to campus, and vice versa (or wherever else may be important). In addition, don't miss out on one of the most important things in college life - getting involved in extracurricular activities! This will help keep life structured as many with ADHD need. Too much extra time can lead to procrastinating and possibly impulsive decisions.

Know your triggers and avoid them.

What are your triggers? For me, it’s deadlines and rushing. I need to start at least a week in advance and then I can work quickly. If you have a different set of triggers, great! Use this as an opportunity to get really clear about what they are and how you can avoid them.

Most people who have ADHD (even those who don’t have it) deal with stress in some way, shape, or form. In many cases, it can cause anxiety if larger steps n are not broken down into smaller ones. Often people with ADHD engage in negative self- talk such as : I am not as good as anyone else, I am terrible at math. Watch for this negative self -talk.

Stay organized

If you know that you have trouble with the organization of your life, it is important to get help prior to starting college and keep the support. There are many apps and computer programs that can help you stay on track and manage your time better. Try making lists of things that need to be done, including daily and weekly goals, so that you can see what needs to be focused on at any given moment. If it helps, set alarms or reminders throughout the day so that nothing slips through the cracks! The reminder app and notes apps on the iphone are very helpful.

You'll also want to consider using a planner or calendar app for this purpose. These tools will allow you to keep track of scheduled events and deadlines in one place without having them scattered throughout different apps on your phone or computer. They're also easy enough to use: just write down all the things that need doing each day into one section (or multiple sections if necessary), then check off items once they've been completed! This might sound easy but with someone with executive functioning challenges it is not.


Plan Your Time: Assess and Prioritize

A lot of students with ADHD struggle to focus on one thing for a long time. You may be able to stay focused for an hour, but then your mind starts to wander and you can't get back into the work at hand. This is where planning comes in! Planning out your day with lists, schedules, and schedules will help keep you on track with your schoolwork while also helping you manage your time in other ways.

One way that helps is by prioritizing their tasks: If there are two things that need to be done today—a paper due tomorrow and a project due next week—they'll usually prioritize based on importance: The paper due tomorrow takes precedence because it's earlier in time than the project due next week.

Start the Day on Time

Many people with ADHD have a hard time getting up in the morning. They may forget to set their alarm clocks and become distracted by something they see on the way to school. Setting your alarm early and using it consistently is one of the best things you can do as an ADHD student.

Calendars are helpful not just for scheduling events, but also in reminding you of assignments that need to be completed by a particular date or day of the week. By using a calendar that has specific slots for each class throughout your day, you'll be less likely to miss important deadlines or assignments due at different times each week. You can also use these calendars as reminders about when certain events are happening (such as tests), which will help prevent other distractions from taking over your focus during those times when it's most important!

If you're having trouble keeping track of all your assignments and deadlines while trying to keep up with other important commitments like family time or socializing with friends, consider using Google Calendar instead! This handy tool allows users access from any device (including smart phones) so there's no excuse not knowing whether or not something needs attention today!"

Not all of us learn in the same way. Talking aloud to a coach can help understand ADHD and figure out strategies to achieve these goals.

Take breaks.

Taking breaks is an important part of learning to manage your ADHD. Taking breaks allows you to come back to the task with fresh eyes and a clear head, which can help you focus more effectively. This helps your executive functioning goals become clearer.

Here are some examples of things you could do during a break:

● Read something that interests you

● Listen to music (or talk radio)

● Take a walk outside (or inside if weather permits)

The length of your breaks depends on how much work you need before returning to your task. If there’s still some time left after taking a short break, then go ahead and take another one! Some people need thirty minutes on and 30 min off.

Stay in touch with family and friends at home.

To make the transition back to school, it can be helpful to stay in touch with friends and family. Make sure you call or email your mom or dad at least once a week so they know what's going on in your life. If you have siblings, talk to them often, too!

If you're feeling lonely or isolated during the first few weeks of school, don't forget about the importance of communication! It's important for everyone involved (students with ADHD included) that everyone understands how their needs are being met and who else is working to meet those needs. Students should set goals for themselves related to communication; these goals could include:

● Calling home regularly

● Writing emails weekly instead of monthly

● Talking more often than usual and being open about any struggles they may be having

Conclusion

As you're reading this, you may still be unsure of what to do next. Feel free to reach out at Lori@allislandspeech.com My daughter experienced these challenges and I am here to tell you with support goals can be achieved with a successful future..



You have the power to make your own choices in life and live a happy, fulfilling life with ADHD. If anything, these tips should give you some direction and remind you that there are many other people like yourself who are doing amazing things.


For more information on coaching please visit www.allislandspeech.com/adhd-life-coaching


Lori Melnitsky is a Certified ADHD coach and an experienced speech/language pathologist. Lori@allislandspeech.com


Parents can also join the face book page for parents of adults of children over age 16.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/768563444534843


#executivefunctioning

#ADHDcoaching




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